Latest & greatest articles for cancer

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Top results for cancer

1. Fifteen year quality of life outcomes in men with localised prostate cancer: population based Australian prospective study. (Full text)

Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study (PCOS).General health and disease specific quality of life were self-reported at seven time points over a 15 year period, using the 12-item Short Form Health Survey scale, University of California, Los Angeles prostate cancer index, and expanded prostate cancer index composite short form (EPIC-26). Adjusted mean differences were calculated with controls as the comparison group. Clinical significance of adjusted mean differences was assessed by the minimally (...) Fifteen year quality of life outcomes in men with localised prostate cancer: population based Australian prospective study. To assess treatment related changes in quality of life up to 15 years after diagnosis of localised prostate cancer.Population based, prospective cohort study with follow-up over 15 years.New South Wales, Australia.1642 men with localised prostate cancer, aged less than 70, and 786 controls randomly recruited from the New South Wales electoral roll into the New South Wales

2020 BMJ PubMed abstract

2. Avelumab (Bavencio) - advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

= stable disease. Objective response rate was defined as complete or partial response on response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) version 1.1 by blinded independent committee review (BICR). At interim analysis-2 quality of life was similar in the avelumab plus axitinib group and sunitinib group as measured on the EuroQol five dimension five level (EQ-5D-5L), functional assessment of 4 cancer therapy – kidney symptom index 19 (FKSI-19) and functional assessment of cancer therapy – disease (...) renal cell carcinoma is an incurable, heterogeneous cancer and not all patients respond to treatment. The disease symptoms have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and make daily living difficult. Anecdotal evidence suggests an increasing number of younger patients have been diagnosed in recent years and symptoms may also affect their ability to look after family and/or work. ? There is an unmet need for a greater choice of treatment options and since approximately 50% of patients

2020 Scottish Medicines Consortium

3. Cancer control plans

Cancer control plans Cancer control plans - Sax Institute - Sax Institute × Close Sign up for our newsletter Name Email * Position Centre Subscribe Cancer control plans The 45 and Up Study Learn more about our research into healthy ageing × The 45 and Up Study Cancer control plans ) for the Cancer Institute NSW 2020. Date of publication: June 2020 Download (PDF 792 KB)

2020 Sax Institute Evidence Check

4. Alpelisib with fulvestrant for treating hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative, PIK3CA-positive advanced breast cancer (terminated appraisal)

Alpelisib with fulvestrant for treating hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative, PIK3CA-positive advanced breast cancer (terminated appraisal) Alpelisib with fulvestrant for treating hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative, PIK3CA-positive advanced breast cancer (terminated appraisal) T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 7 October 2020 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta652 © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice (...) -of- rights).Contents Contents Advice 3 Information 3 Alpelisib with fulvestrant for treating hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative, PIK3CA-positive advanced breast cancer (terminated appraisal) (TA652) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 3Advice Advice NICE is unable to make a recommendation about the use in the NHS of alpelisib with fulvestrant for treating hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

5. Osimertinib for treating EGFR T790M mutation-positive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

mutation-positive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (TA653) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 17This guidance replaces TA416. 1 1 Recommendations Recommendations 1.1 Osimertinib is recommended as an option for treating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) T790M mutation-positive locally advanced or metastatic non- small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in adults, only if: • their disease has progressed (...) it appropriate to stop. Why the committee made these recommendations Why the committee made these recommendations This appraisal reviews the additional evidence collected as part of the Cancer Drugs Fund managed access agreement for osimertinib for treating EGFR T790M mutation-positive locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC for adults whose disease has progressed after treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (NICE technology appraisal guidance 416). EGFR T790M mutation-positive locally advanced

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

6. Osimertinib for untreated EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer

Osimertinib for untreated EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer Osimertinib for untreated EGFR mutation-positive non- small-cell lung cancer T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 14 October 2020 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta654 © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Your responsibility Your responsibility The recommendations in this guidance represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful (...) a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Osimertinib for untreated EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (TA654) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 20Contents Contents 1 Recommendation 4 2 Information about osimertinib 5 Marketing authorisation

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

7. Pembrolizumab with axitinib for untreated advanced renal cell carcinoma

with intermediate or poor-risk cancer as defined by the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium. Nivolumab with ipilimumab and avelumab with axitinib are available through the Cancer Drugs Fund. Because they are not established practice, they cannot be comparators in this appraisal. Short-term clinical trial evidence shows that pembrolizumab with axitinib is more effective than sunitinib for people with untreated renal cell carcinoma, but it is uncertain if there is a long-term benefit (...) issues (issues 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, and 9), which were outstanding after the technical engagement stage. New treatment option New treatment option People with untreated renal cell carcinoma would welcome a new People with untreated renal cell carcinoma would welcome a new treatment option treatment option 3.1 In England, kidney cancer is expected to cause about 3,783 deaths every year, with 10,759 new cases per year. Of people with kidney cancer, 80% have renal cell carcinoma. A patient expert explained

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

8. Selective internal radiation therapies for unresectable early-, intermediate- or advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma: systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation (Full text)

Selective internal radiation therapies for unresectable early-, intermediate- or advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma: systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation Selective internal radiation therapies for unresectable early-, intermediate- or advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma: systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (...) (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This study concluded that the existing evidence cannot provide decision-makers with clear guidance on the comparative effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of selective internal radiation therapies for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

2020 NIHR HTA programme PubMed abstract

9. Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer

Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer Oregon Health Authority : Evidence-based Reports Blog : Health Evidence Review Commission : State of Oregon menu Toggle Main Menu Main Navigation close search Search search Submit You are here: Evidence-based Reports Blog menu Site Navigation Evidence-based Reports Blog Full Width Column 1 Select Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Acellular Dermal Matrix for Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction Compliance (...) ={ListId}'); return false;} if(pageid == 'audit') {STSNavigate(unescape(decodeURI('{SiteUrl}'))+ '/_layouts/15/Reporting.aspx' +'?Category=Auditing&backtype=item&ID={ItemId}&List={ListId}'); return false;} if(pageid == 'config') {STSNavigate(unescape(decodeURI('{SiteUrl}'))+ '/_layouts/15/expirationconfig.aspx' +'?ID={ItemId}&List={ListId}'); return false;}}, null); 0x0 0x1 ContentType 0x01 898 BlogTopic Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer

2020 Oregon Health Evidence Review Commission

10. Local recurrence after local excision of early rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of completion TME, adjuvant (chemo)radiation, or no additional treatment (Full text)

excision, especially those with high-risk pT1 and pT2 rectal cancer. The lowest recurrence risk is provided by cTME; aCRT has outcomes comparable to those of cTME for high-risk pT1 tumours, but shows a higher risk for pT2 tumours. Antecedentes: Tras una resección temprana de un cáncer de recto localizado, hay que considerar el equilibrio entre el riesgo de recidiva local y la morbilidad relacionada con el tratamiento. El objetivo de este metaanálisis era determinar los resultados oncológicos tras la (...) Review. Show more similar articles References Steele RJC, McClements P, Watling C, Libby G, Weller D, Brewster DH et al. Interval cancers in a FOBT-based colorectal cancer population screening programme: implications for stage, gender and tumour site. Gut 2012; 61: 576-581. Morris EJA, Whitehouse LE, Farrell T, Nickerson C, Thomas JD, Quirke P et al. A retrospective observational study examining the characteristics and outcomes of tumours diagnosed within and without of the English NHS Bowel Cancer

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

11. Shared follow-up and survivorship care for women with low-risk endometrial cancer: summary of evidence

to many other cancers. 23,1,* ` Due to the relatively high survival rate, there is an increasing number of endometrial cancer survivors. 1 ` Surgery is the primary treatment for endometrial cancer. 2 ` Many women with endometrial cancer have co-morbidities including obesity-related issues, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. 3-5 Co-morbidity rates reported for women with uterine cancer include: 59% with hypertension, 34% with obesity, 26% with diabetes and 12% with chronic pulmonary (...) disease. 4 Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women with localised or low grade endometrial cancer. 21, 22 Endometrial cancer recurrence ` Definitions of low-risk endometrial cancer vary, but low-risk groups commonly include International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IA or IB endometrial cancers that are histological grade 1 or grade 2. 6 ` Endometrial cancer has a low recurrence rate overall of approximately 13% and for patients considered low-risk

2020 Cancer Australia

12. Guidance for the management of early breast cancer: Recommendations and practice points

Consider further surgery (re-excision or mastectomy, as appropriate) after breast-conserving surgery where there is invasive cancer and/or DCIS within 2mm of but not at the radial margins (>0mm and <2 mm). Practice Point In patients with Paget’s disease of the nipple, perform breast imaging prior to surgery to exclude underlying breast malignancy. Recommendation In patients with Paget’s disease of the nipple with or without underlying breast cancer, offer breast-conserving surgery with removal (...) or armpit. The scope of this guidance covers the management of early breast cancer in women and men. The scope does not include the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) which is non-invasive, or the management of advanced or metastatic cancer. Guidance is included for the management and care of early breast cancer across the patient journey from the point of breast cancer diagnosis, including treatment planning and information and support for patients before treatment, treatment delivery

2020 Cancer Australia

13. Guidance for the management of early breast cancer: Methods

of early breast cancer. A separate resource is currently being developed for consumers by the Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA), with support from Cancer Australia. 2.2 Scope Early breast cancer is considered in the current context to be: ‘invasive breast cancer that is contained in the breast and may or may not have spread to lymph nodes in the breast or armpit. Some cancer cells may have spread outside the breast and armpit area but cannot be detected’. This excludes ductal carcinoma in situ (...) to recommendations – e.g. GRADE, SIGN, NHMRC • Breast cancer subtype(s) – early breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, Paget’s disease, patients at high-risk of breast cancer, patients BRCA1/2 positive • Main aspect(s) of care covered (referred to during development as ‘topics’) – e.g. surgery, radiotherapy, systemic therapy, follow up, survivorship care, etc. Key characteristics of all initially identified CPGs are provided in Appendix F. 3.2.3 Selection of guidelines Thirty-eight of the 84 identified CPGs

2020 Cancer Australia

14. Consolidation or maintenance systemic therapy for newly diagnosed stage II, III, or IV epithelial ovary, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma

Consolidation or maintenance systemic therapy for newly diagnosed stage II, III, or IV epithelial ovary, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma Guideline 4-18 A Quality Initiative of the Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC), Ontario Health (Cancer Care Ontario) Consolidation or maintenance systemic therapy for newly diagnosed stage II, III, or IV epithelial ovary, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma H. Hirte, X. Yao, S.E. Ferguson, T. May, L. Elit, and the Ovarian Cancer (...) @mcmaster.ca PEBC Report Citation (Vancouver Style): Hirte H, Yao X, Ferguson SE, May T, Elit L, and the Ovarian Cancer guideline Development Group. Consolidation or maintenance systemic therapy for newly diagnosed stage II, III, or IV epithelial ovary, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma. Toronto (ON): Ontario Health (Cancer Care Ontario); 2020 September 28. Program in Evidence-Based Care Guideline No.: 4-18. PUBLICATIONS RELATED TO THIS REPORT Hirte H, Yao X, Ferguson SE, May T, Elit L

2020 Cancer Care Ontario

15. Staging and Follow-up of Vulvar Cancer)

/Background Vulvar cancer is a rare gynecologic malignancy. In the United States, it is estimated that approximately 6,120 women will present with vulvar cancer, and 1,350 will succumb to their disease in 2020 [1]. Most patients are diagnosed with early-stage disease, and the majority of tumors originate in the labia majora [2,3]. The 5-year survival rate is 86% for patients with vulvar-confined disease but is reduced to 57% for patients with regional lymph node metastases, and 17% for patients (...) disease are noted on physical examination. Clinical palpation of groin lymph nodes is performed, although this approach is limited by the high false-negative rate [10]. The status of inguinofemoral lymph nodes (IFLNs) is the most important prognostic factor in vulvar cancer. The likelihood of lymph node metastases is estimated by primary tumor size, depth of stromal invasion, and presence of lymphovascular space invasion [11-15]. Traditionally, IFLN assessment entailed complete lymphadenectomy. High

2020 American College of Radiology

16. COVID-19 Recovery: Implications for cancer care

follow-up examinations to patients with a positive screening test. 7 • Potential diagnostic delays due to disruption of screening programs, delayed GP visits and delayed access to diagnostic pathways, have been modelled to result in patients potentially presenting with more advanced diseases (a shift in the disease stage at treatment initiation), the need for more complex treatments, including systemic therapies, and poorer outcomes. 20 6 COVID-19 Recovery: Implications for cancer care (...) in developing patient resources in response to identified needs. This aimed to provide consistent information across tumour streams and created a unified voice of the cancer community support sector. 7 7.2 Impact of change • The provision of responsive information and guidance for people undergoing cancer treatment, cancer survivors and carers has been critical in meeting information and support needs during the pandemic. 7.3 How can high-value changes be embedded or enhanced? The following strategies were

2020 Cancer Australia

17. Metastatic Carcinoma and Myeloma of the Femur

Quality and Value Department 4. Tyler Verity, BA Medical Librarian, AAOS Clinical Quality and Value Department11 INTRODUCTION Overview The skeleton is a frequent site of metastasis in patients with cancer. Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy in which 70-80% of patients present with lytic lesions in the skeleton (Terpos, 2013). Bone lesions, whether from metastatic carcinoma or multiple myeloma, can be painful and limit physical activity. They may require radiation therapy, surgery or both (...) of age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, or socioeconomic status. Burden of Disease The skeleton is a frequent site of metastatic carcinoma and myeloma. Primary sites of disease that commonly metastasize to bone include breast, lung, prostate, kidney, and thyroid. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimates new cases in 2017 at 252,710 for breast, 222,500 for lung, 161,360 for prostate, and 63,990 for kidney (2019). Autopsy studies have shown an incidence of bone metastases of approximately 70

2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

18. Recommendations for the Management of Actionable Incidental Findings in the Lung Cancer Screening Pilot for People at High Risk

and relevant clinical information will be reported in the Impressions section of the reporting template, and the S-Modifier should be utilized For each IF, follow up recommendations were developed for actionable scenarios and are described in the summary table. References 1. CT-Definable Subtypes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Statement of the Fleischner Society. Lynch, David A. et al. 1, Octover 2015, Radiology, Vol. 277. 2. Selection criteria for lung-cancer screening. Tammemägi MC, Katki HA (...) Recommendations for the Management of Actionable Incidental Findings in the Lung Cancer Screening Pilot for People at High Risk 525 University Avenue, 5th Floor, Toronto ON, M5G 2L3 Guidelines for the Management of Actionable Incidental Findings in the Lung Cancer Screening Pilot for People at High Risk Dr. Micheal McInnis, Lead, Radiology Quality Assurance, University Health Network Dr. Heidi Schmidt, Clinical Radiology Lead, Lung Cancer Screening Pilot for People at High Risk Michelle Ang

2020 Cancer Care Ontario

19. Shared follow-up and survivorship care for low-risk endometrial cancer: Supporting self-management and living well

or depressed changes in memory, attention and concentration financial or employment issues (such as loss of income or costs of treatment, travel and accommodation) lower leg lymphoedema (swelling of the legs) which can affect mobility (unlikely following treatment for low-risk endometrial cancer). What can I do to live well after endometrial cancer? There are a number of other medical issues or diseases that can occur alongside endometrial cancer. These are known as co-morbidities and they may impact (...) on your wellbeing after endometrial cancer. Being overweight or obese is a common co-morbidity among people with endometrial cancer. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure are some other common co-morbidities. Managing co-morbidities has the potential to improve your health and wellbeing following treatment for endometrial cancer. If you experience any side effects, including ones that are not listed here, it is important that you speak with your primary care practitioner/s (General

2020 Cancer Australia

20. Shared follow-up and survivorship care for low-risk endometrial cancer: Screening, assessment and management of supportive care needs of women with low-risk endometrial cancer

treatment for low-risk endometrial cancer). Co-morbidities Many women with endometrial cancer also experience a range of co-morbidities including: obesity related issues hypertension diabetes cardiovascular disease** Co-morbidities increase the complexity of follow-up care for women with low-risk endometrial cancer and their care should be managed holistically using a multidisciplinary approach. Addressing the underlying risk factors for these conditions has the potential to improve outcomes of women (...) affected by low-risk endometrial cancer 3 . SHARED FOLLOW-UP AND SURVIVORSHIP CARE FOR LOW-RISK ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ** Evidence suggests that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women with endometrial cancer 4 * Shared care team refers to members of the specialist multidisciplinary gynaecological cancer team (specialist team; including but not limited to gynaecological oncologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynaecologists, nurses and/or allied health

2020 Cancer Australia