Latest & greatest articles for cardiovascular disease

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Top results for cardiovascular disease

1. Association between the reproductive health of young women and cardiovascular disease in later life: umbrella review. (Full text)

plots and tabular presentations was performed. Associations for composite cardiovascular disease were: twofold for pre-eclampsia, stillbirth, and preterm birth; 1.5-1.9-fold for gestational hypertension, placental abruption, gestational diabetes, and premature ovarian insufficiency; and less than 1.5-fold for early menarche, polycystic ovary syndrome, ever parity, and early menopause. A longer length of breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. The associations (...) contraceptives or progesterone only pill), pre-eclampsia, and recurrent pre-eclampsia; 1.5-1.9-fold for current use of combined oral contraceptives, gestational diabetes, and preterm birth; and less than 1.5-fold for polycystic ovary syndrome. The association for heart failure was fourfold for pre-eclampsia. No association was found between cardiovascular disease outcomes and current use of progesterone only contraceptives, use of non-oral hormonal contraceptive agents, or fertility treatment.From menarche

2020 BMJ PubMed abstract

2. Evaluating the value of apolipoprotein B testing for the assessment and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease at the MUHC RUISSS

Evaluating the value of apolipoprotein B testing for the assessment and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease at the MUHC RUISSS Report available at https://muhc.ca/tau Technology Assessment Unit of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) Evaluating the value of apolipoprotein B testing for the assessment and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease at the MUHC RUISSS Report number: 84 DATE: May 14 th , 2020 Report available at https://muhc.ca/tau Report prepared (...) cardiovascular disease at the MUHC RUISSS. Montreal (Canada): Technology Assessment Unit (TAU) of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC); 2020 May 14. Report no. 84. 64 pagesApoB iii 14 May 2020 Technology Assessment Unit, MUHC ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The expert assistance of the following individuals is gratefully acknowledged: ? David Blank, MUHC Site Chief, Division of Biochemistry, Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, MUHC ? Allan Sniderman, Cardiologist at the MUHC and Senior Scientist

2020 McGill TAU reports

3. Management of Dyslipidemia for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction: Synopsis of the 2020 Updated U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and U.S. Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guideline. (Abstract)

Management of Dyslipidemia for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction: Synopsis of the 2020 Updated U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and U.S. Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guideline. In June 2020, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) released a joint update of their clinical practice guideline for managing dyslipidemia to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in adults. This synopsis describes the major recommendations.On 6 August to 9

2020 Annals of Internal Medicine

4. Interventions to Improve Statin Tolerance and Adherence in Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease : A Systematic Review for the 2020 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and U.S. Department of Defense Guidelines for Management of Dyslipidemia. (Abstract)

Interventions to Improve Statin Tolerance and Adherence in Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease : A Systematic Review for the 2020 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and U.S. Department of Defense Guidelines for Management of Dyslipidemia. Strategies to improve patients' tolerance of and adherence to statins may enhance the effectiveness of dyslipidemia treatment in those at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD).To assess the benefits and harms of interventions to improve statin

2020 Annals of Internal Medicine

5. Blood pressure targets for the treatment of people with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. (Abstract)

Blood pressure targets for the treatment of people with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This is the second update of the review first published in 2017. Hypertension is a prominent preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. People with hypertension and established cardiovascular disease are at particularly high risk, so reducing blood pressure to below standard targets may be beneficial. This strategy could reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity but could also (...) increase adverse events. The optimal blood pressure target in people with hypertension and established cardiovascular disease remains unknown.To determine if lower blood pressure targets (135/85 mmHg or less) are associated with reduction in mortality and morbidity as compared with standard blood pressure targets (140 to 160/90 to 100 mmHg or less) in the treatment of people with hypertension and a history of cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, peripheral vascular occlusive

2020 Cochrane

6. Effect of alirocumab on major adverse cardiovascular events according to renal function in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome: prespecified analysis from the ODYSSEY OUTCOMES randomized clinical trial (Full text)

in both groups across all categories of eGFR. Conclusions: In patients with recent ACS, alirocumab was associated with fewer cardiovascular events and deaths across the range of renal function studied, with larger relative risk reductions in those with eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Keywords: Acute coronary syndrome; Chronic kidney disease; Glomerular filtration rate; Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; Major adverse cardiovascular events; PCSK9 inhibition. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford (...) Effect of alirocumab on major adverse cardiovascular events according to renal function in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome: prespecified analysis from the ODYSSEY OUTCOMES randomized clinical trial Effect of alirocumab on major adverse cardiovascular events according to renal function in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome: prespecified analysis from the ODYSSEY OUTCOMES randomized clinical trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

7. 2020 ESC Guidelines on Sports Cardiology and Exercise in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

testing, field testing and/or after muscular strength testing 13 Figure 3a and 3b SCORE charts for European populations of countries at HIGH and LOW cardiovascular disease risk 15 Figure 4 Proposed algorithm for cardiovascular assessment in asymptomatic individuals with risk factors for and possible subclinical chronic coronary syndrome before engaging in sports for individuals aged >35 years 18 Figure 5 Clinical evaluation and recommendations for sports participation in individuals with established (...) Bicuspid aortic valve BMI Body mass index BP Blood pressure BrS Brugada syndrome CAC Coronary artery calcium CAD Coronary artery disease CCS Chronic coronary syndrome CCTA Coronary computed tomography angiography CHD Congenital heart disease CKD Chronic kidney disease CMD Coronary microvascular dysfunction CMR Cardiac magnetic resonance CPET Cardiopulmonary exercise test CPR Cardiopulmonary resuscitation CT Computed tomography CV Cardiovascular CVA Cerebrovascular accident CVD Cardiovascular disease

2020 European Society of Cardiology

8. Lipoprotein(a) and Family History Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Lipoprotein(a) and Family History Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Lipoprotein(a) and Family History Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. Get the latest public health information from CDC: . Get the latest research from NIH (...) Optional text in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Display options Display options Format Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Am Coll Cardiol Actions . 2020 Aug 18;76(7):781-793. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.06.040. Lipoprotein(a) and Family History Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Emory

2020 EvidenceUpdates

9. Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease. (Abstract)

to alter dietary fats and achieving a reduction in saturated fat; 3) compared with higher saturated fat intake or usual diet; 4) not multifactorial; 5) in adult humans with or without cardiovascular disease (but not acutely ill, pregnant or breastfeeding); 6) intervention duration at least 24 months; 7) mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available.Two review authors independently assessed inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias. We performed random-effects meta-analyses, meta (...) Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease. Reducing saturated fat reduces serum cholesterol, but effects on other intermediate outcomes may be less clear. Additionally, it is unclear whether the energy from saturated fats eliminated from the diet are more helpfully replaced by polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, carbohydrate or protein.To assess the effect of reducing saturated fat intake and replacing it with carbohydrate (CHO), polyunsaturated (PUFA

2020 Cochrane

10. Genetic Testing for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association (Full text)

published 23 Jul 2020 Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine. ;0 Abstract Advances in human genetics are improving the understanding of a variety of inherited cardiovascular diseases, including cardiomyopathies, arrhythmic disorders, vascular disorders, and lipid disorders such as familial hypercholesterolemia. However, not all cardiovascular practitioners are fully aware of the utility and potential pitfalls of incorporating genetic test results into the care of patients and their families (...) Genetic Testing for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Genetic Testing for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine Search Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search Search 2020 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access Review Article

2020 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

11. Role of Combination Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: Insights From the COMPASS Trial (Full text)

Role of Combination Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: Insights From the COMPASS Trial Role of Combination Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: Insights From the COMPASS Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable (...) Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Circulation Actions . 2020 Jun 9;141(23):1841-1854. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.046448. Epub 2020 Mar 28. Role of Combination Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: Insights From the COMPASS Trial , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Collaborators, Affiliations Expand Collaborators COMPASS Steering

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

12. Noncoding RNAs in Cardiovascular Disease: Current Knowledge, Tools and Technologies for Investigation, and Future Directions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association (Full text)

Noncoding RNAs in Cardiovascular Disease: Current Knowledge, Tools and Technologies for Investigation, and Future Directions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Noncoding RNAs in Cardiovascular Disease: Current Knowledge, Tools and Technologies for Investigation, and Future Directions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine Search Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged (...) in Search Search 2020 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access Review Article Share on Jump to Free Access Review Article Noncoding RNAs in Cardiovascular Disease: Current Knowledge, Tools and Technologies for Investigation, and Future Directions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , MD, PhD, Chair , MD, FAHA, Co-chair , PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD, PhD , MD, PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , MD

2020 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

13. Effect of a Comprehensive Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Intervention in Persons With Serious Mental Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial (Full text)

Abstract Importance: Persons with serious mental illness have a cardiovascular disease mortality rate more than twice that of the overall population. Meaningful cardiovascular risk reduction requires targeted efforts in this population, who often have psychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of an 18-month multifaceted intervention incorporating behavioral counseling, care coordination, and care management for overall cardiovascular risk reduction (...) in adults with serious mental illness. Design, setting, and participants: This randomized clinical trial was conducted from December 2013 to November 2018 at 4 community mental health outpatient programs in Maryland. The study recruited adults with at least 1 cardiovascular disease risk factor (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, current tobacco smoking, and/or overweight or obesity) attending the mental health programs. Of 398 participants screened, 269 were randomized to intervention (132

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

14. Cardiovascular Disease, Drug Therapy, and Mortality in Covid-19. (Full text)

Cardiovascular Disease, Drug Therapy, and Mortality in Covid-19. Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) may disproportionately affect people with cardiovascular disease. Concern has been aroused regarding a potential harmful effect of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) in this clinical context.Using an observational database from 169 hospitals in Asia, Europe, and North America, we evaluated the relationship of cardiovascular disease and drug (...) to 1.74).Our study confirmed previous observations suggesting that underlying cardiovascular disease is associated with an increased risk of in-hospital death among patients hospitalized with Covid-19. Our results did not confirm previous concerns regarding a potential harmful association of ACE inhibitors or ARBs with in-hospital death in this clinical context. (Funded by the William Harvey Distinguished Chair in Advanced Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.).Copyright © 2020

2020 NEJM PubMed abstract

15. Effect of Ticagrelor Monotherapy vs Ticagrelor With Aspirin on Major Bleeding and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: The TICO Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

Effect of Ticagrelor Monotherapy vs Ticagrelor With Aspirin on Major Bleeding and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: The TICO Randomized Clinical Trial. Discontinuing aspirin after short-term dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) was evaluated as a bleeding reduction strategy. However, the strategy of ticagrelor monotherapy has not been exclusively evaluated in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS).To determine whether switching to ticagrelor monotherapy after 3 (...) with ticagrelor-based 12-month DAPT (HR, 0.56 [95% CI, 0.34 to 0.91]; P = .02). The incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events was not significantly different between the ticagrelor monotherapy after 3-month DAPT group (2.3%) vs the ticagrelor-based 12-month DAPT group (3.4%) (HR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.45 to 1.06]; P = .09).Among patients with acute coronary syndromes treated with drug-eluting stents, ticagrelor monotherapy after 3 months of dual antiplatelet therapy, compared with ticagrelor

2020 JAMA

16. Maternal cardiovascular risk after hypertensive disorder of pregnancy

Maternal cardiovascular risk after hypertensive disorder of pregnancy Maternal Cardiovascular Risk After Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine National Center for Biotechnology Information Show account info Close Account Logged (...) Actions . 2020 May 13;heartjnl-2020-316541. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2020-316541. Online ahead of print. Maternal Cardiovascular Risk After Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Cardiology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. 2 Cardiometabolic, George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. 3 Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4 Medicine, University of New South Wales

2020 EvidenceUpdates

17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular and Microvascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Findings From a Population-Based Cohort Study (Full text)

Obstructive Sleep Apnea, a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular and Microvascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Findings From a Population-Based Cohort Study Obstructive Sleep Apnea, a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular and Microvascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Findings From a Population-Based Cohort Study - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other (...) for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Diabetes Care Actions . 2020 Apr 28;dc192116. doi: 10.2337/dc19-2116. Online ahead of print. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular and Microvascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Findings From a Population-Based Cohort Study , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

18. Strategies For Risk Reduction and Management of Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Strategies For Risk Reduction and Management of Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic Strategies For Risk Reduction and Management of Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic - American College of Cardiology ') Search All Types Search or Menu . This article was authored by Nicole M. Orr, MD, FACC , and the Geriatric Cardiology Council. Share via: Clinical Topics: Keywords: Aged, SARS Virus, Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists (...) , Hydroxychloroquine, Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists, Caregivers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, COVID-19, Coronavirus, Coronavirus Infections, Neprilysin, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Neprilysin, Chloroquine, Subacute Care, Social Isolation, Skilled Nursing Facilities, Cardiovascular Diseases > > Strategies For Risk Reduction and Management of Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic Heart House 2400 N Street NW Washington, DC 20037 Phone: , ext

2020 American College of Cardiology

19. Covid-19 and cardiovascular disease. (Abstract)

Covid-19 and cardiovascular disease. Guideline: Diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease during the covid-19 pandemicPublished by the European Society of Cardiology.This summary is based on the version published on 21 April 2020 (https://www.escardio.org/Education/COVID-19-and-Cardiology/ESC-COVID-19-Guidance).Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing

2020 BMJ

20. Variations between women and men in risk factors, treatments, cardiovascular disease incidence, and death in 27 high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries (PURE): a prospective cohort study. (Abstract)

Variations between women and men in risk factors, treatments, cardiovascular disease incidence, and death in 27 high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries (PURE): a prospective cohort study. Some studies, mainly from high-income countries (HICs), report that women receive less care (investigations and treatments) for cardiovascular disease than do men and might have a higher risk of death. However, very few studies systematically report risk factors, use of primary or secondary (...) prevention medications, incidence of cardiovascular disease, or death in populations drawn from the community. Given that most cardiovascular disease occurs in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), there is a need for comprehensive information comparing treatments and outcomes between women and men in HICs, middle-income countries, and low-income countries from community-based population studies.In the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological study (PURE), individuals aged 35-70 years from urban

2020 Lancet