Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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Top results for colorectal cancer

1261. Cost effectiveness analysis of intensive versus conventional follow up after curative resection for colorectal cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

compares favourably with screening for breast and CRC cancers and for abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors suggested that large randomised trials should be carried out to confirm the economic advantages of intensive follow-up. They also discussed the critical issues that need further exploration. Source of funding None stated. Bibliographic details Renehan A G, O'Dwyer S T, Whynes D K. Cost effectiveness analysis of intensive versus conventional follow up after curative resection for colorectal (...) cancer. BMJ 2004; 328: 81 PubMedID DOI Original Paper URL Other publications of related interest Renehan AG, Egger M, Saunders MP, et al. Impact on survival of intensive follow up after curative resection for colorectal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. BMJ 2002;324:813. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms /economics /surgery; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Follow-Up Studies; Health Care Costs; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1262. Faecal DNA testing compared with conventional colorectal cancer screening methods: a decision analysis

; the age-specific non-CRC mortality rates; the mean survival from distant cancer; the test characteristics (sensitivity and specificity) of F-DNA, FOBT, FS and COLO for CRC, large and small polyps; the percentage of polyps or CRC within reach of a sigmoidoscope; the rate of major complications for COLO and FS; and the mortality rates related to COLO and FS. Study designs and other criteria for inclusion in the review English language literature using the terms colorectal neoplasm, colorectal polyp (...) and over; Colonoscopy /economics; Colorectal Neoplasms /diagnosis; Cost-Benefit Analysis; DNA /analysis; Decision Trees; Endoscopy, Digestive System; Feces /chemistry; Humans; Life Tables; Markov Chains; Mass Screening /economics; Middle Aged; Monte Carlo Method; Sensitivity and Specificity AccessionNumber 22004000695 Date bibliographic record published 30/04/2005 Date abstract record published 30/04/2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) Produced by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1263. Cost-effectiveness analysis of fecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer

Cost-effectiveness analysis of fecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer Cost-effectiveness analysis of fecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer Cost-effectiveness analysis of fecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer Lejeune C, Arveux P, Dancourt V, Bejean S, Bonithon-Kopp, Faivre J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results (...) and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study examined a biennial faecal occult blood test (FOBT) for the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC). Type of intervention Screening. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised a hypothetical cohort of asymptomatic individuals aged 50 to 74 years. Setting The setting was primary care. The economic study was carried

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1264. Metastatic colorectal carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus that of hepatic resection Full Text available with Trip Pro

, Solbiati L, Meloni MF, et al. Treatment of focal liver tumors with percutaneous radio-frequency ablation: complications encountered in a multicenter trial. Radiology 2003;226:441-51. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Aged; Carcinoma /secondary /surgery; Catheter Ablation /economics; Clinical Protocols; Colorectal Neoplasms /pathology; Cost of Illness; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Decision Trees; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Care Costs; Hepatectomy /methods; Humans; Liver Neoplasms (...) Metastatic colorectal carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus that of hepatic resection Metastatic colorectal carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus that of hepatic resection Metastatic colorectal carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus that of hepatic resection Gazelle G S, McMahon P M, Beinfeld M T, Halpern E F, Weinstein M C Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1265. Colorectal neoplasia screening with virtual colonoscopy: when, at what cost, and with what national impact

to screen for colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults. New England Journal of Medicine 2003;349:2191-200. Inadomi JM, Sonnenberg A. An evidence-based medicine approach to economic studies: assessing the cost-effectiveness of competing strategies for colorectal cancer screening. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2003;1:404-13. Song K, Fendrick AM, Ladabaum U. Faecal DNA testing compared to conventional colorectal cancer screening methods: a decision analysis. Gastroenterology 2004;126:1270-9 (...) Colorectal neoplasia screening with virtual colonoscopy: when, at what cost, and with what national impact Colorectal neoplasia screening with virtual colonoscopy: when, at what cost, and with what national impact Colorectal neoplasia screening with virtual colonoscopy: when, at what cost, and with what national impact Ladabaum U, Song K, Fendrick A M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1266. 1% Lymphazurin vs 10% fluorescein for sentinel node mapping in colorectal tumours Full Text available with Trip Pro

the costs are prohibitive. Source of funding None stated. Bibliographic details Dan A G, Saha S, Monson K M, Wiese D, Schochet E, Barber K R, Ganatra B, Desai D, Kaushal S. 1% Lymphazurin vs 10% fluorescein for sentinel node mapping in colorectal tumours. Archives of Surgery 2004; 139(11): 1180-1184 PubMedID DOI Other publications of related interest Saha S, Nora D, Wong J, et al. Sentinel lymph node mapping in colorectal cancer: a review. Surgical Clinics of North America 2000;80:1811-9. Bendavid Y (...) , Latulippe J, Younan R, et al. Phase I study on sentinel lymph node mapping in colorectal cancer: a preliminary report. Journal of Surgical Oncology 2002;79:81-4. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Colorectal Neoplasms /pathology; Contrast Media; Female; Fluorescein; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Retrospective Studies; Rosaniline Dyes; Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy /methods AccessionNumber 22004001511 Date bibliographic record published 30/04

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1267. The cost-effectiveness of aspirin versus cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for colorectal carcinoma chemoprevention in healthy individuals

for chemoprevention in healthy individuals, assuming equal efficacy in cancer prevention. However, they highlighted the need for additional studies to determine the efficacy of both aspirin and coxibs in preventing tumours, in order to confirm the equivalency assumption made for their analysis. Source of funding None stated. Bibliographic details Hur C, Simon L S, Gazelle G S. The cost-effectiveness of aspirin versus cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for colorectal carcinoma chemoprevention in healthy (...) The cost-effectiveness of aspirin versus cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for colorectal carcinoma chemoprevention in healthy individuals The cost-effectiveness of aspirin versus cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for colorectal carcinoma chemoprevention in healthy individuals The cost-effectiveness of aspirin versus cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for colorectal carcinoma chemoprevention in healthy individuals Hur C, Simon L S, Gazelle G S Record Status This is a critical

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1268. Cost-benefit analysis of capecitabine versus 5-flourouracil/lecovorin in the treatment of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands

regimen of 3-week cycles, with 2 weeks of treatment followed by a 1-week rest period. Type of intervention Treatment and palliative care. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Some inclusion criteria were reported such as no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Setting The setting was hospital and home. The economic study was carried out in The Netherlands (...) year was 2002. Statistical analysis of costs Costs appear to have been treated deterministically. Indirect Costs Indirect costs were not taken into account. The authors stated that patients are unlikely to incur any loss of productivity; given the severity of the disease, most patients cannot work when suffering from advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. In addition, many patients in the trial used for effectiveness data were older than 65 years. Currency Euros (EUR). Sensitivity analysis

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1269. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening: comparison of community-based flexible sigmoidoscopy with fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy

The authors assumed that: non-compliers with screening had the same probability of a colorectal abnormality as those not screened; abnormalities detected by screening had the same disease course as those detected clinically; the dwell time of cancer in Dukes stages A, B, C and D was one year, thus, a Dukes stage A cancer would progress to a Dukes stage B after 1 year; survival at each Dukes type was the same regardless of whether it was detected by screening or by clinical symptoms; if complications arose (...) Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening: comparison of community-based flexible sigmoidoscopy with fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening: comparison of community-based flexible sigmoidoscopy with fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening: comparison of community-based flexible sigmoidoscopy with fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy O'Leary B A, Olynyk J K, Neville A M

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1270. Economic evaluation of extended and conventional prophylaxis with enoxaparin against venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery for abdominal cancer

:975-80. Davies LM, Richardson GA, Cohen AT, et al. Economic evaluation of enoxaparin as post discharge prophylaxis against deep-vein thrombosis in elective hip surgery. Value in Health 2000;3:397-406. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Abdomen /surgery; Abdominal Neoplasms /surgery; Anticoagulants /therapeutic use; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight /therapeutic use; Postoperative Complications /economics /prevention & Risk Factors; Thromboembolism /prevention (...) Economic evaluation of extended and conventional prophylaxis with enoxaparin against venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery for abdominal cancer Economic evaluation of extended and conventional prophylaxis with enoxaparin against venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery for abdominal cancer Economic evaluation of extended and conventional prophylaxis with enoxaparin against venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery for abdominal cancer Gozzard D

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1271. Two schedules of second-line irinotecan for metastatic colon carcinoma: economic evaluation of a randomized trial

Two schedules of second-line irinotecan for metastatic colon carcinoma: economic evaluation of a randomized trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

1272. Using risk for advanced proximal colonic neoplasia to tailor endoscopic screening for colorectal cancer. (Abstract)

Using risk for advanced proximal colonic neoplasia to tailor endoscopic screening for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic screening for colorectal cancer has been suggested because sigmoidoscopy misses nearly half of persons with advanced proximal neoplasia.To create a clinical index to stratify risk for advanced proximal neoplasia and to identify a subgroup with very low risk in which screening sigmoidoscopy alone might suffice.Cross-sectional study.A company-based program of screening colonoscopy (...) for colorectal cancer.Consecutive persons 50 years of age or older undergoing first-time screening colonoscopy between September 1995 and June 2001.A clinical index with 3 variables was created from information on the first 1994 persons. Points were assigned to categories of age, sex, and distal findings. Risk for advanced proximal neoplasia (defined as an adenoma 1 cm or larger or one with villous histology, severe dysplasia, or cancer) was measured for each score. The index was tested on the next 1031

2003 Annals of Internal Medicine

1273. Risk factors for advanced colonic neoplasia and hyperplastic polyps in asymptomatic individuals. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk factors for advanced colonic neoplasia and hyperplastic polyps in asymptomatic individuals. Knowledge of risk factors for colorectal neoplasia could inform risk reduction strategies for asymptomatic individuals. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic individuals, compared risk factors between persons with and without polyps, or included most purported risk factors in a multivariate analysis.To determine risk factors associated (...) with advanced colorectal neoplasia in a cohort of asymptomatic persons with complete colonoscopy.Prospective, cross-sectional study of 3121 asymptomatic patients aged 50 to 75 years from 13 Veterans Affairs medical centers conducted between February 1994 and January 1997. All participants had complete colonoscopy to determine the prevalence of advanced neoplasia, defined as an adenoma that was 10 mm or more in diameter, a villous adenoma, an adenoma with high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. Variables

2003 JAMA

1274. Computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy to screen for colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

in diameter. Two polyps were malignant; both were detected on virtual colonoscopy, and one of them was missed on optical colonoscopy before the results on virtual colonoscopy were revealed.CT virtual colonoscopy with the use of a three-dimensional approach is an accurate screening method for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic average-risk adults and compares favorably with optical colonoscopy in terms of the detection of clinically relevant lesions.Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical (...) Computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy to screen for colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults. We evaluated the performance characteristics of computed tomographic (CT) virtual colonoscopy for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in an average-risk screening population.A total of 1233 asymptomatic adults (mean age, 57.8 years) underwent same-day virtual and optical colonoscopy. Radiologists used the three-dimensional endoluminal display for the initial detection of polyps on CT virtual

2003 NEJM

1275. Association of the cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism with advanced colorectal cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of the cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism with advanced colorectal cancer. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a key cell cycle regulatory protein, the overexpression of which is often found in human tumors and is associated with cell proliferation and poor prognosis. A common adenine-to-guanine substitution polymorphism (A870G) in the CCND1 gene results in an altered messenger RNA transcript and a longer-life protein, which are preferentially encoded by the A allele.To test the overall and stage (...) at an earlier stage (P =.048). In subset analyses, the association between the A allele and advanced colorectal cancer was statistically significant in white and Hawaiian participants but not in Japanese, and was stronger for rectal cancer.The CCND1 870A allele may be associated with colorectal cancer, and particularly with forms of the disease that result in severe morbidity and mortality.

2003 JAMA

1276. Operative mortality in colorectal cancer: prospective national study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Operative mortality in colorectal cancer: prospective national study. To develop a mathematical model that will predict the probability of death after surgery for colorectal cancer.Descriptive study using routinely collected clinical data.The database of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI), encompassing 8077 patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer in 73 hospitals during a 12 month period.A three level hierarchical logistic regression model was used (...) for colorectal cancer.

2003 BMJ

1277. Survivin and molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. (Abstract)

Survivin and molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is thought to originate in the expansion of colonic crypt cells as a result of aberrant gene expression caused by transcription factors of the T-cell factor (TCF)/beta-catenin family. Survivin is a bifunctional regulator of cell death and cell proliferation expressed during embryonic development but undetectable in healthy adult tissues and re-expressed in many cancers, including colorectal cancer.We investigated gene (...) expression by promoter analysis, mutagenesis, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay in colorectal cancer cells. Survivin expression in human and mouse embryonic intestine was determined by in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. Changes in apoptosis were monitored in cell lines engineered to express stabilising mutations in beta catenin.TCF/beta catenin stimulated a six-fold to 12-fold increased expression of the survivin gene in colorectal cancer cells. Three TCF-binding elements (TBE

2003 Lancet

1278. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and molecular carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinomas. (Abstract)

which NSAIDs alter colonic carcinogenesis have been elucidated, including the induction of apoptosis in neoplastic cells, via mechanisms dependent and independent of cyclo-oxygenase. Some studies have suggested an important role for the cell-cycle regulating protein p21 in mediating the chemopreventive effect of sulindac. A decrease in p21 expression may be one of the main oncogenic events in the development of colorectal cancer. Thus p21 could be the molecular link in the chemopreventive effects (...) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and molecular carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinomas. Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the west. The high incidence and mortality make effective prevention an important public-health and economic issue. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis and are among the few agents known to be chemopreventive. Randomised trials have shown that sulindac and celecoxib suppress

2003 Lancet

1279. Dietary fibre in food and protection against colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): an observational study. (Abstract)

fibre in foods was inversely related to incidence of large bowel cancer (adjusted relative risk 0.75 [95% CI 0.59-0.95] for the highest versus lowest quintile of intake), the protective effect being greatest for the left side of the colon, and least for the rectum. After calibration with more detailed dietary data, the adjusted relative risk for the highest versus lowest quintile of fibre from food intake was 0.58 (0.41-0.85). No food source of fibre was significantly more protective than others (...) Dietary fibre in food and protection against colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): an observational study. Dietary fibre is thought to protect against colorectal cancer but this view has been challenged by recent prospective and intervention studies that showed no protective effect.We prospectively examined the association between dietary fibre intake and incidence of colorectal cancer in 519978 individuals aged 25-70 years taking part

2003 Lancet

1280. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome: genetics and clinical implications. (Abstract)

an established HNPCC kindred. Microsatellite instability (MSI) of DNA is a hallmark feature of HNPCC-associated tumors, and as many as 15% of cases of sporadic colorectal cancer also display MSI. The biological behavior of colorectal tumors with MSI is distinctive; the most intriguing feature is their favorable natural history. The study of HNPCC has provided an example of the powerful interplay between molecular genetics and clinical care. (...) The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome: genetics and clinical implications. Basic studies of DNA replication and repair have provided surprising and pivotal insights into a novel pathway of tumorigenesis. Defects in the DNA mismatch repair process dramatically increase the risk for specific types of cancer because of instability in microsatellite DNA sequences. A germline mutation in either the hMSH2 or hMLH1 mismatch repair gene results in the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal

2003 Annals of Internal Medicine