Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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Top results for colorectal cancer

121. Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could (...) not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Neither eicosapentaenoic acid nor aspirin reduced the proportion of individuals with any colorectal adenoma recurrence during surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , & . Mark A Hull 1, * , Kirsty Sprange 2 , Trish Hepburn 2 , Wei

2019 NIHR HTA programme

122. Towards risk-stratified colorectal cancer screening. Adding risk factors to the fecal immunochemical test: Evidence, evolution and expectations (Abstract)

Towards risk-stratified colorectal cancer screening. Adding risk factors to the fecal immunochemical test: Evidence, evolution and expectations With increasing incidence and mortality, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing health problem worldwide. An effective way to address CRC is by screening for fecal (occult) blood by the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). However, there is room for improvement since precursor lesions and CRC bleed intermittent and can therefore be missed by the FIT (false

2019 EvidenceUpdates

123. 47 Colorectal cancer screening – doing no harm? – A systematic review of the evidence (Ongoing) Full Text available with Trip Pro

47 Colorectal cancer screening – doing no harm? – A systematic review of the evidence (Ongoing) 47 Colorectal cancer screening – doing no harm? – A systematic review of the evidence (Ongoing) | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here 47 Colorectal cancer screening – doing no harm? – A systematic review of the evidence (Ongoing) Article Text Oral Presentations 47 Colorectal cancer screening – doing no harm? – A systematic review of the evidence (Ongoing) Free Frederik Martiny , , Anne Katrine Lykke Bie , , Christian Jauernik , , Or Rahbek , , Sigrid Brisson Nielsen , , John Brodersen , Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions

2019 Oral Presentations

124. Duration of Oxaliplatin-Containing Adjuvant Therapy for Stage III Colon Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline (Abstract)

Duration of Oxaliplatin-Containing Adjuvant Therapy for Stage III Colon Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline To develop recommendations for duration of adjuvant chemotherapy with a fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin for patients with completely resected stage III colon cancer based on the results of trials of 3 months compared with 6 months of treatment.ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of relevant studies. The guideline recommendations were based on the review (...) of evidence by the Expert Panel.Pooled data from the six International Duration Evaluation of Adjuvant Chemotherapy (IDEA) Collaboration randomized controlled trials comprise the evidence base for these guideline recommendations.The recommendations for therapy duration apply to patients with completely resected stage III colon cancer who are being offered adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and a fluoropyrimidine. Recommendations are informed by the findings of a recent pooled analysis of clinical

2019 EvidenceUpdates

125. PWE-051 The association of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

PWE-051 The association of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis PWE-051 The association of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis | Gut Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here PWE-051 The association of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis Article Text Posters PWE-051 The association of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis Free Dominic Lagrue , Nikhil Aggarwal , Kevin Monahan , Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any

2019 Posters

126. PWE-053 Meta-analysis of tumour microsatellite-instability, as a predictor of response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

PWE-053 Meta-analysis of tumour microsatellite-instability, as a predictor of response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer PWE-053 Meta-analysis of tumour microsatellite-instability, as a predictor of response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer | Gut Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword (...) Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here PWE-053 Meta-analysis of tumour microsatellite-instability, as a predictor of response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer Article Text Posters PWE-053 Meta-analysis of tumour microsatellite-instability, as a predictor of response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer Free Alberto

2019 Posters

127. IDDF2019-ABS-0111 Colorectal cancers detected following surgery at anastomoses or other colorectal locations during colonoscopy surveillance – a systematic review and meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

IDDF2019-ABS-0111 Colorectal cancers detected following surgery at anastomoses or other colorectal locations during colonoscopy surveillance – a systematic review and meta-analysis IDDF2019-ABS-0111 Colorectal cancers detected following surgery at anastomoses or other colorectal locations during colonoscopy surveillance – a systematic review and meta-analysis | Gut Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user (...) name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here IDDF2019-ABS-0111 Colorectal cancers detected following surgery at anastomoses or other colorectal locations during colonoscopy surveillance – a systematic review and meta-analysis Article Text Clinical Gastroenterology IDDF2019-ABS-0111 Colorectal cancers

2019 Clinical Gastroenterology

128. Effect of High-Dose vs Standard-Dose Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Progression-Free Survival Among Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The SUNSHINE Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of High-Dose vs Standard-Dose Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Progression-Free Survival Among Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The SUNSHINE Randomized Clinical Trial In observational studies, higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels have been associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).To determine if high-dose vitamin D3 added to standard chemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with metastatic CRC.Double-blind phase 2 (...) randomized clinical trial of 139 patients with advanced or metastatic CRC conducted at 11 US academic and community cancer centers from March 2012 through November 2016 (database lock: September 2018).mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab chemotherapy every 2 weeks and either high-dose vitamin D3 (n = 69) or standard-dose vitamin D3 (n = 70) daily until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent.The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) assessed by the log-rank test

2019 EvidenceUpdates

129. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, early detection and management of colorectal cancer

, and developed for health professionals practising in an Australian health care setting. This publication reflects the views of the authors and not necessarily the views of the Australian Government. Cite this guideline Cancer Council Australia Colorectal Referring to the large bowel, comprising the colon and rectum. Cancer Guidelines Working Party. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, early detection and management of colorectal cancer. Sydney: Cancer Council Australia. [Version URL: , cited (...) Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, early detection and management of colorectal cancer Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, early detection and management of colorectal cancer - Cancer Guidelines Wiki Skip Links Personal tools Search Navigation Cancer Council guidelines Methodology Hosted cancer guidelines Adolescents and Young Adult (AYA) guidelines Prevention Policies Social links Page actions The guideline recommendations were approved by the Chief Executive Officer

2019 Cancer Council Australia

130. Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Relapse-Free Survival Among Patients With Digestive Tract Cancers: The AMATERASU Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Relapse-Free Survival Among Patients With Digestive Tract Cancers: The AMATERASU Randomized Clinical Trial. Randomized clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation for secondary prevention in patients with cancer are needed, given positive results of observational studies.To determine whether postoperative vitamin D3 supplementation can improve survival of patients with digestive tract cancers overall and in subgroups stratified by 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 (...) [OH]D) levels.The AMATERASU trial, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at a single university hospital in Japan. Enrollment began in January 2010 and follow-up was completed in February 2018. Patients aged 30 to 90 years with cancers of the digestive tract from the esophagus to the rectum, stages I to III, were recruited. Of 439 eligible patients, 15 declined and 7 were excluded after operation.Patients were randomized to receive oral supplemental capsules of vitamin D

2019 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

131. Bevacizumab (Zirabev) - cancers of the colon, rectum, breast, lung, kidney and cervix

it is authorised in the EU What is Zirabev and what is it used for? Zirabev is a cancer medicine that is used to treat adults with the following cancers: • cancer of the colon (large bowel) or the rectum (the last section of the bowel), when it has spread to other parts of the body; • breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body; • a lung cancer called non-small cell lung cancer when it is advanced or has spread or come back, and cannot be treated with surgery. Zirabev can be used unless the cancer (...) Bevacizumab (Zirabev) - cancers of the colon, rectum, breast, lung, kidney and cervix 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5555 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact © European Medicines Agency, 2019. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. EMA/886373/2018 EMEA/H/C/004697 Zirabev (bevacizumab) An overview of Zirabev and why

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

132. Randomized clinical trial of selective decontamination of the digestive tract in elective colorectal cancer surgery (SELECT trial) (Abstract)

in a multicentre, open-label RCT in six centres in the Netherlands. Patients with colorectal cancer scheduled for elective curative surgery with a primary anastomosis were eligible. Oral colistin, tobramycin and amphotericin B were administered to patients in the SDD group to decontaminate the digestive tract. Both treatment and control group received intravenous cefazolin and metronidazole for perioperative prophylaxis. Mechanical bowel preparation was given for left-sided colectomies, sigmoid and anterior (...) Randomized clinical trial of selective decontamination of the digestive tract in elective colorectal cancer surgery (SELECT trial) Infectious complications and anastomotic leakage affect approximately 30 per cent of patients after colorectal cancer surgery. The aim of this multicentre randomized trial was to investigate whether selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) reduces these complications of elective colorectal cancer surgery.The effectiveness of SDD was evaluated

2019 EvidenceUpdates

133. Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy or Surveillance in Resected Biliary Tract Cancer (PRODIGE 12-ACCORD 18-UNICANCER GI): A Randomized Phase III Study (Abstract)

Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy or Surveillance in Resected Biliary Tract Cancer (PRODIGE 12-ACCORD 18-UNICANCER GI): A Randomized Phase III Study No standard adjuvant treatment currently is recommended in localized biliary tract cancer (BTC) after surgical resection. We aimed to assess whether gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy (GEMOX) would increase relapse-free survival (RFS) while maintaining health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients who undergo resection.We

2019 EvidenceUpdates

134. Participation and Ease of Use in Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Comparison of 2 Fecal Immunochemical Tests (Abstract)

Participation and Ease of Use in Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Comparison of 2 Fecal Immunochemical Tests The impact of fecal immunochemical test (FIT)-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening on disease incidence and mortality is affected by participation, which might be influenced by ease of use of the FIT. We compared the participation rates and ease of use of 2 different FITs in a CRC screening program.There were two study designs within the Dutch CRC screening program. In a paired cohort

2019 EvidenceUpdates

135. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer

Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer 1 Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer Interim Guidance from the Kaiser Permanente National Integrated Cardiovascular Health (ICVH) Work Group October 5, 2018 Three randomized clinical trials (ARRIVE 1 , ASCEND 2 , and ASPREE 3 ) recently published results on aspirin use in patients without known Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD). The studies looked at benefits including (...) daily. • There is no recommendation for or against aspirin therapy in adults aged < 50 or = 60 years. • Exclude adults with increased risk of bleeding. This includes those with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, GI ulcers, intracranial bleed, bleeding disorders, renal failure, severe liver disease, thrombocytopenia, or using NSAIDS daily, or other medicine to prevent blood clots. The recommendations above reflect a change from initiate to consider in adults aged 50-59 years with 10-year

2019 Kaiser Permanente National Guideline Program

136. Early Detection for Colorectal Cancer Resource-Stratified Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Early Detection for Colorectal Cancer Resource-Stratified Guideline Early Detection for Colorectal Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Guideline | Journal of Global Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JGO.18.00213 Journal of Global Oncology - published online before print February 25, 2019 PMID: Early Detection for Colorectal Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Guideline , MD, MBA 1 (...) Yantiss ; and , MD, PhD 16 x Marcia Cruz Correa 1 University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL 2 Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 3 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA 4 American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon 5 Hospital Clinico Universitario, Valencia, Spain 6 Rwanda Military Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda 7 Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India 8 National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan 9 University of Malaya, Kuala

2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

137. Treatment of Patients with Early-Stage Colorectal Cancer Resource-Stratified Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of Patients with Early-Stage Colorectal Cancer Resource-Stratified Guideline Treatment of Patients With Early-Stage Colorectal Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Guideline | Journal of Global Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JGO.18.00214 Journal of Global Oncology - published online before print February 25, 2019 PMID: Treatment of Patients With Early-Stage (...) Colorectal Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Guideline , MD, MPH 1 x Ainhoa Costas-Chavarri ; , MD 2 3 x Govind Nandakumar ; , MSPH 4 x Sarah Temin ; , MD, MBA 5 x Gilberto Lopes ; , MD, PhD 6 x Andres Cervantes ; , MD, PhD 7 8 x Marcia Cruz Correa ; , MD 9 x Rena Engineer ; , MD, PhD 10 x Chisato Hamashima ; , MD 11 x Gwo Fuang Ho ; , MD 12 x Fidel David Huitzil ; , MD 13 x Mona Malekzadeh Moghani ; , MD 14 x Ala I. Sharara ; , PhD 15 x Mariana C. Stern ; , MD 16 x Catherine Teh ; , MD 12 x Sara E

2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

138. Lymphocyte-C-reactive Protein Ratio as Promising New Marker for Predicting Surgical and Oncological Outcomes in Colorectal Cancer (Abstract)

Lymphocyte-C-reactive Protein Ratio as Promising New Marker for Predicting Surgical and Oncological Outcomes in Colorectal Cancer MINI: In the present study, we systemically and comprehensively evaluated the prognostic significance of a combination of inflammatory factors using preoperative blood examination, and focused on the potential feasibility of our newly developed lymphocyte-CRP ratio (LCR) as a prognostic biomarker in CRC patients. We have firstly identified that a combination (...) of inflammatory factors using preoperative blood, and to assess the clinical significance of our newly developed inflammatory score in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.In total 477 CRC patients from the discovery and validation cohorts were enrolled in this study. We assessed the predictive impact for recurrence using a combination of nine inflammatory markers in the discovery set, and focused on lymphocyte-C-reactive protein ratio (LCR) to elucidate its prognostic and predictive value for peri-operative risk

2019 EvidenceUpdates

139. Familial colorectal cancer risk in half siblings and siblings: nationwide cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Familial colorectal cancer risk in half siblings and siblings: nationwide cohort study. To explore the risk of colorectal cancer in family members of patients with colorectal cancer, with an emphasis on subtypes of second degree relatives, especially half siblings, which were lacking in the literature.Ambidirectional cohort study.Nationwide Swedish Family Cancer Data (record linkage).All people residing in Sweden and born after 1931, with their biological parents, totalling >16 million (...) individuals (follow-up: 1958-2015); of those with clear genealogy, 173 796 developed colorectal cancer.Lifetime (0-79 years) cumulative risk and standardised incidence ratio of colorectal cancer among first degree relatives and second degree relatives.The overall lifetime cumulative risk of colorectal cancer in siblings of patients was 7%, which represents a 1.7-fold (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 1.7; n=2089) increase over the risk in those without any family history of colorectal cancer. A similarly

2019 BMJ

140. Screening for colorectal cancer-where does the fit-DNA test fit?

will continue to improve, and blood tests for CRC are in development. Research and one blood test, Epi pro Colon, was approved by the FDA in 2016. However, it is not currently recommended by the USPSTF. As this area of research develops, it is important that physicians remain aware of all the currently available USPTSF-approved screening modalities. “One size fits all” may not be the most effective cancer screening approach for all patients. Studies have shown that colonoscopy may be avoided by large (...) numbers of patients averse to the procedure and by underserved persons who prefer at-home stool testing. To these and other patients with intermittent access to healthcare, FIT-DNA may provide the best option for screening. It is the most sensitive stool test, and a positive result could potentially lead at-risk patients to colonoscopy that they would otherwise shun. Cancer screening saves lives. And colonoscopy remains the gold standard for detecting colorectal cancers. Without it, large numbers

2019 Clinical Correlations